Is my donation to Puppy Jake Foundation tax deductible?
YES, PJF is a 501(c)(3) non profit organization dedicated to providing professionally trained service dogs to wounded military veterans.  The Tax ID is:  #46-1187854.

When was Puppy Jake Foundation started?
PJF was founded in February of 2013.

What specifically are some of the skills the service dogs perform?
PJF service dogs are trained to assist with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and mobility impairments.    The service dogs may be trained to block, watch, interrupt flashbacks and navigate crowds for those suffering from PTSD.  For mobility impairments, the service dogs may be trained to turn on/off lights, open/close doors and drawers, pick up items and retrieve items.

Where do the puppies and/or dogs come from?
Puppies are purchased from reputable breeders and picked up around eight weeks of age.   PJF requires that the parents of the puppies have passed appropriate health clearances for hips, elbows, eyes and heart.  PJF also works with the ARL and rescue groups identify rescue dogs.  

What breed of dogs do you use and why?
Puppy Jake Foundation trains Golden Retrievers, Labrador Retrievers and German Shepherds.  These three breeds are the right size for service dog work (not too big nor too small) and they are quite smart and easily trained.  These dogs have wonderful temperaments and are loving and loyal.

How many dogs are in the program?
As of December 2016, fourteen service dogs have been placed with their wounded military veteran.  There are currently 26 dogs in various stages of training.  Between 10-12 dogs are scheduled to graduate in 2017.

What do foster families do?  How much work is it?
Foster families raise and train dogs for 18-24 months.  The dogs live with the foster family and basically go everywhere with them.  There is an extensive training program, including weekly classes, outings, travel, homework and evaluations.

Do I need to have experience to be a foster family or puppy sitter?
Puppy Jake Foundation teaches the humans to teach the canines!   There are orientation classes and requirements before receiving a dog.  The trainers are readily available to help and guide foster families through the entire process.

I'm a Veteran, how do I apply?
First, thank you for your service to our country.  The first phase of the application process is found on the website.  Complete the “Application of Interest” and the Application Review Committee will be in touch with the next steps.  There is a mandatory two-week “Team Training” prior to receiving a service dog.

As a Veteran, what happens if I'm accepted into the program?
Applicants selected to receive a Puppy Jake Foundation service dog will begin to work with trainers several months before the Team Training.  Extensive follow-up training with Puppy Jake Foundation is required throughout the entire life of the Human-Canine team.  PJF works with the veteran’s support system and providers.

Why do folks volunteer?
Puppy Jake Foundation relies on volunteers!  There are over 200 dedicated volunteers, 32 foster families and a growing network of supporters.  PJF has a dedicated Board of Directors, trainers and volunteers.  Volunteers have shared there is “an enormous satisfaction helping this wonderful organization”, a strong feeling of ‘family’ among the team.  A volunteer said, What a meaningful way to give back and help a wounded military veteran.”

Where may I find out financial and policy information on PJF?
The current Annual Report, IRS 990, and Financials are found publically on website.  Additionally, Puppy Jake Foundation has received the Better Business Bureau Charity Accreditation.

I've heard it's expensive to train a service dog?  Is that true and approximately how much is it?
Yes, it is approximately $18,000 to $20,000 to raise a service dog.   This does include the purchase of the puppy and food, veterinary care and training for up to 2 years.

How much does a Veteran have to pay for a service dog?
Puppy Jake Foundation does NOT charge for a service dog.  There is an application fee of $150 at the second phase of the application process.  

Who pays for the care of the service dog once it is placed with a veteran?
Upon completion of Team Training, the veteran assumes the financial responsibility of the service dog.